Friday, November 17, 2017

HUMANS OF SECS: MALI VELASCO

We know it's been awhile, but today we're back with a brand new Humans of SECS! Today we'd like you to meet Mali Velasco, who is one of our Sustainable Business chairs for this year. Mali is a senior in NRES, with a concentration in Global Change and Landscape Dynamics, and a minor in Business. She is an NRES Ambassador, part of the Sigma Alpha Professional Agricultural Sorority, and the current president of Styrecycle. Mali also works in the medical entomology lab researching how climate change affects mosquito distribution and the spread of infectious diseases. This is her third year in SECS, and first as Sustainable Business co-chair!


"Growing up in Ecuador, a small tropical country that’s rich in biodiversity, I was exposed to environmental issues since I was kid. When I was a child I couldn’t understand why people wouldn’t stop throwing garbage on the streets and natural areas. Or why oil companies wouldn’t just stop drilling to avoid oil spills in the rainforest. These issues made me realize I wanted to spend my entire life protecting our natural resources from being polluted and exploited."


Photographs by Abbi Pstrzoch

Monday, October 9, 2017

HUMANS OF SECS: CALEB BRANDMEYER

Hello everyone! Get excited - it's time for another Humans of SECS! Today let's meet Caleb Brandmeyer, one of our Beyond Coal co-chairs for this year. Caleb is a junior in Biochemistry, and when he is not working hard on coal-related problems, he is also an Undergraduate Researcher in the Department of Chemistry and a member of the American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. This is Caleb's third year in SECS, and second serving as a Beyond Coal co-chair.

Photograph by Abbi Pstrzoch
"The area in which I grew up is one that has been impacted heavily by mining and industry. Knowing how we’ve ravaged our land and poisoned our air for so long, causing houses to sink into the ground from mine subsidence and residents of communities near to mine to have cancer rates at ten times the national average, is nothing short of demoralizing. But this is exactly why I believe we must take action. It is not some vague moral cause for which environmentalists are working, it’s for the betterment of the lives of real people and for the preservation of our shared experience on this earth."

Photograph by Sofiya Bobrovska